Texas Redistricting and GOPAC-TX

Texas is poised to gain up to four  U.S. Congressional seats after the 2010 census numbers come out.  The 82nd legislative session will be dominated by redistricting even though there are other important issues the legislatures must overcome.

Graphic taken from the Texas Tribune

That is why the Texas State House races are so important this election season.  For once a state house race can effect national politics.  If the Republicans pick up enough new seats from the Democrats and hold onto all of their seats then they will be able to draw the map more in favor of their own party.  This would allow the four new congressional seats to be drawn as Republican seats and allow us to send an even larger delegation to DC to oppose Obama’s and Pelosi’s agenda.  Just think that if Texas had gotten these 4 seats during the last redistricting Speaker Pelosi might not of had the votes to pass ObamaCare.

Enter GOPAC-TX.

The purpose of GOPAC-TX is to serve as the central Republican organization dedicated to recruiting, training and electing more Republicans to the Texas Legislature. A combined 63 elected officials from the Texas Senate and Texas House of Representatives have joined together in this unprecedented effort to ensure that Texas maintains its position as the #1 one place to do business, raise a family and protect Texas values.

The leaders behind GOPAC-TX have recognized the national importance our local state house races have this election cycle and they are working hard to make sure that we elect enough conservative legislatures in the Texas State House so we can send the largest Republican delegation to DC next year!

Here is a report from CNNMoney.com about the population growth in Texas.

Census Bureau: Dallas posts biggest population gain

By Hibah Yousuf, staff reporterMarch 23, 2010: 1:39 PM ET

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — Don’t mess with Texas! Cities in the Lone Star State were among the fastest growing places in 2009.

Dallas-Fort Worth and Houston gained the most new residents of any city — netting more than 140,000 each — according to the Census Bureau’s annual metropolitan area population estimates released on Wednesday. Meanwhile, music center Austin posted the second highest growth rate among top cities — 3.1% — just behind Raleigh, N.C.

“Texas stands as the most prominent Sun Belt survivor of the last half of the decade because of its diversified economy, smaller run-ups in housing prices, and fewer foreclosures,” said William Frey, a demographer for the Brookings Institute, a liberal think tank.

Overall, the population of the United States has grown more than 9% to 307,006,550 since the 2000 census. The population grew 0.86% since last year’s estimates.

These figures are an advance look at what to expect when the 2010 census results are released in December. The population figures determine how much federal money states and cities receive, as well their representation in Congress, among other things.

Full Story here.

The Texas Tribune has a good report on the realities of redistricting.

Redistricting Reality

by Ross RamseyIn politics, the crayon is mightier than the ballot. A political mapmaker can do more to change the power structure than a herd of consultants with fat bank accounts behind them. And 2011 will be the Year of the Mapmakers.

They’ll take the new census numbers — Texas is expected to have a population of more than 25 million — and use them to draw new congressional and legislative districts for the state. The last time this was done, in 2003, Republican mappers took control of the Texas House by peeling away enough seats from the Democrats to give the GOP the numbers it needed for a majority.

Now, Texas is poised to add up to four seats to its congressional delegation. And early numbers indicate political bad news ahead for West Texas and other areas that haven’t kept up with the state’s phenomenal growth.

Full story here.

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